Saturday, November 24, 2007

LECTURE- Drugs and Organized Crime, Filippo De Danieli, Nov 26, OSCE Centre in Dushanbe

Distrib. by: Central-Eurasia-L - Announcement List for Central Eurasian Studies


LECTURE- Drugs and Organized Crime, Nov 26, OSCE Centre in Dushanbe

Posted by: Payam Foroughi <payamforoughi@aol.com>

As part of its Open Lecture Series, the OSCE Centre in Dushanbe invites you to:

"Drugs, Political (Dis)order, and the Central Asian Borderlands: The
Case of Tajikistan"
By Mr. Filippo De Danieli, PhD Student, University of London, SOAS
Monday, 26 November, 2007, 4:15 PM
OSCE Centre in Dushanbe
12 Zikrullo Khajaev St.

Abstract: The emergence of criminal networks as actors of political
and economic processes is one of the un-intended consequences of
Soviet Collapse. Among the Central Asian republics, Tajikistan has
also been affected by this "criminalization syndrome". In his
presentation, De Danieli will highlight why since 1991 the former
Soviet Union, and Tajikistan in particular, has demonstrated a fertile
ground for establishing criminal activities, specifically drug
trafficking. De Danieli will explore the negative (and positive)
effects of the shadow economy on broader political-economic dynamics
of the newly created states of Tajikistan and its neighborhood, in
addition to the effectiveness of international counter-narcotics and
border-control policies practiced in the region.

Bio: Filippo De Danieli is pursuing a Doctorate from the University of
London, School of Oriental and African studies (SOAS). His research
emphasis is on "The Drugs-Development-State-building Nexus in
Tajikistan". In 2002, De Danieli completed a study at the University
of Padova titled: "El poder sin atajos ni fronteras del narcotrafico:
El caso de la coca en Colombia" ("The Absolute Power of
Narcotrafficking: The Case of Coca in Colombia"). In 2005, De Danieli
completed a Master's thesis at the University of Roma titled: "La
Nuova via Della Seta: Droga e Geopolitica in Asia Centrale-Il Caso del
Tajikistan" ("The New Silk Road: Drug and Geopolitics in Central
Asia-case of Tajikistan"). For the past eight months, De Danieli has
been conducting fieldwork in Tajikistan for his PhD dissertation,
three months of which has been in his capacity as Intern with the
OSCE. For this, De Danieli has conducted nearly 100 interviews with
Tajikistan's civil society, international organizations, academics,
journalists, and government officials.

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1 comment:

peter said...

Criminalization has increased the levels of dead people on the streets since the organized crime never rest when it comes to doing business with drugs. I'm an old man and I know well how this killing spree started. I'm so old that I now need to get Viagra Online to satisfy my wife.